Category Archives: heros

Hoke rescue dog tirlessly searching and brining much needed smiles

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Jenner A Memorial to a Hero

Jenner was 9 at the time he was called upon to work double duty at ground Zero.


I really love the photo if Jenner and her rescue pal getting a well deserved nap”Hoke”.

from http://dogsinthenews.com/issues/0206/articles/020601y.htm#

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Worf heroic 911 search dog felt the tragedy just as we did

Exhausted, stressed and war-weary dogs receive the best care, both physical and mental, that humans can give.
“Worf” located the bodies of two missing firefighters on the first day. Overwhelmed, he lay down and curled up on the spot. The dog began shedding profusely, quit eating and refused to play with other dogs. His partner Mike Owens made the decision to retire the 12-year-old German Shepherd from search-and-rescue duty permanently. They are now back at home in Monroe, Ohio, where the entire town takes turns petting and playing with Worf.

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Lucy senior dog at Ground Zero

Lynne Engelbert & “Lucy”, age 10½
California Task Force 4 (Oakland, CA).

“We worked 12-15 hrs., went through decon and back to the Javits where she was greeted by the VMAT folks (they were awesome!), bathed in warm water, given her nose-to-tail vet check, fed, walked and then I would go take care of me. Usually when I returned from the shower, she would be out playing tug with the firefighters. Endless energy! Lucy was able to locate numerous remains and help to bring closure for several families … There are no credits on the rooftop shot. I just handed my camera to a nearby firefighter and asked him to take some shots. The rubble site shot was on the Marriott hotel site where Lucy located the remains of a firefighter. This photo was taken by Tom Clark, Structural Specialist with CA TF4 … Thank you for your efforts to recognize these wonderful animals.” — Lynne Engelbert.
NEW YORK CITY, N.Y. (USA) — As a rule, emergency rescuers don’t hesitate to consider their own hides. Sadly, there were 341 brave firefighters who died by that credo in the Sept. 11 horror last year. And, not to be overlooked, just as many dogs were just as eager to rush toward an uncertain fate for the sake of duty.

Only one dog died in the World Trade Center1, but the risks taken by each of the estimated 350 search-and-rescue (SAR) pooches were immense, nonetheless. They walked on shattered glass, stuck their noses into concrete dust and crawled on their bellies through cavities that even rats were too afraid to explore. So what exactly is the price for such devotion?

Skin cancer, prostatitis, nerve damage and arthritis are a few of the ailments that are dogging “Bear”, a 12-year-old Golden Retriever who sniffed through the rubble for three months. But we’ll get to Bear’s story in a minute. First, let’s hear the facts agreed upon by most veterinarians and handlers.

“The University of Penn is doing a study of the teams that worked the WTC and Pentagon,” says Lynne Engelbert, a rescuer with California Task Force 4, “So we will find out in about 3 years if there are any ill effects.

“Lucy (left) didn’t have any issues at all. And she was 10½ years old at the time. She worked the rubble like a puppy … I know more of the teams that worked either the WTC or the Pentagon and know of nothing so far in any of them.”

Indeed, if there’s one indisputable point, it’s that the ASPCA, Suffolk County SPCA, VMAT and “doggy M*A*S*H” units took good care of our four-legged helpers (and we can’t overlook the TLC from a few volunteer dog-chiropractors on site who offered some professional back-rubs). But even with such expert care, our canine first-aid teams were not infallible.

For one, there’s no accounting for the psychological trauma that possibly could have affected some of the dogs. Fortunately, though, most dogs who have been trained in disaster recovery were well prepared for the “smell of death”.

As Ms. Engelbert explains: “This is what Lucy and I train to do. Although the site was massive and the devastation total, we were ready to go to work and did so as soon as we could. …finding the dead isn’t new to us. Although we would much prefer to find the living, helping to bring closure for the families of the victims was also gratifying. Knowing the families had ‘something’ definitive and could go on with their lives brings a sense of accomplishment.

“Neither one of us have had any emotional issues as a result of this deployment.”

full article here;:http://dogsinthenews.com/issues/0207/articles/020723a.htm

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Ricky the smallest dog at Ground Zero

Ricky the Smallest Rescue Dog at the World Trade Center

“Even the tiniest Poodle or Chihuahua is still a wolf at heart.”

— Dorothy Hinshaw Patent,
Dogs: The Wolf Within

SEATTLE, WA (USA) — We’ve all heard about the German Shepherds, the Rottweilers, Labs and Bloodhounds who combed the fallen World Trade Center in search of victims last month, but what about the lap dogs? They’re no exception to the courageous canine list.

Last week, the Seattle City Council held a ceremony to honor a few of the brave souls who helped with New York City search-and-rescue (SAR) efforts: 62 firefighters, police, doctors, engineers and public-safety personnel, all working with Puget Sound Urban Search and Rescue. Also invited to the podium were four SAR dogs, including one so small that many people in the audience had to squint to get a good look at him—that would be “Ricky” the Rat Terrier.

Ricky, measuring in at 17″ and 280 ounces, didn’t let his diminutive size deter him from his duties at “the pile”. In fact, he worked his tininess to his advantage, squeezing into holes that other dogs and robots were too large to navigate. Ricky and his trainer, Janet Linker of the Seattle Fire Department, searched the ruins for 10 days, helping to find the bodies of several victims, according to The Seattle Times.

At two years old, Ricky can climb aluminum ladders, run complex patterns on command and differentiate between the living and the dead. On June 17, 2000, Ricky attained the official certification at Basic Level after proving that he can search through piles of concrete at a site the size of half a baseball field, finding three victims in less than 10 minutes, unfazed by bulldozers, jackhammers, cats in cages and dirty laundry set up as distractions. Even so, the carnage at the World Trade Center site pushed Ricky’s abilities beyond anything he’d ever experienced.

“There were a few situations where we had to climb underneath metal beams, and the space just kept getting smaller and smaller,” says Ms. Linker, who works for Northwest Disaster Search Dogs.

She and Ricky worked closely with another SAR pair, Kent Olson (forensic therapist at Western State Hospital) and a 5-year-old Golden Retriever named “Thunder”, working the two dogs’ abilities in tandem. Ricky would wriggle into tight spots that 64-lb. Thunder could not manage, and Thunder, a more experienced dog (certified Advanced Level) would verify Ricky’s finds.

When Ricky found a body, he would signal by standing very still and looking at his handler intently with all the fur on his body standing up; Thunder would confirm the find by lying down as his signal to his partner. Rescuers would then know exactly where to dig.

Both dogs’ indication of a “live find” was to have been a bark, but unfortunately they never had the chance to make that signal.

“It’s really hard to know exactly how many people Ricky helped find,” says Ms. Linker. “I saw them take a policeman and a firefighter out from areas that we had just searched. I don’t know how many people were in the stairwell. There were lots of people in there. They were gone, not alive.”

http://dogsinthenews.com/issues/0110/articles/011015a.htm

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full article here

Coby and Guinness two labrador retrievers — searched tirelessly through the rubble of the World Trade Center 10 years ago before returning home to Southern California and, eventually, retirement at their handlers’ Highland home.
Coby was 6 when he was deployed to the WTC site with Redlands Battalion Chief David Graves.

Both of these dogs worked for an even larger and more crowded area than they were trained for, they searched for 11 days in 12 hour shifts. There reward was a nap or a chew toy

Over the years Cody lost his hearing but continued working with hand signals. Guiness had been trained for wilderness search and recovery before joining Riverside Task Force 6.

The massive pile of wreckage was so dangerous multiple times it was cleared of searchers because of fear of more collapse.

Coby has sinced passed on but not before finding 18 to 20 people in this human holocaust at Ground Zero. One can only imagine there is a reserved spot in heaven for such heroism.

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Orion the Yellow Labrador hunting and searching , a star and a hero..

Named for a mythical hunter and a constellation, search and rescue dog Orion has become a star in his old age.

full article here By Cathy Locke

The golden retriever, who lives in Vacaville with owner and handler Robert Macaulay, was one of more than 100 search and rescue dogs sent by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to New York City to help locate victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center. Now 13 years old, Orion and the 14 other 9/11 search and rescue dogs surviving a decade later are featured in a book, “Retrieved,” by photographer Charlotte Dumas, scheduled for publication this month.
He and Orion participated in the 9/11 search as volunteers with the Oakland Urban Search and Rescue Task Force, one of eight such groups in California. It was Orion’s first collapsed-building assignment. Because the dog had just passed the first of two certification tests, Macaulay said, they weren’t sent until two weeks after the attack.
“By that time,” he said, “we knew we were looking only for remains.”
Orion found three sets of remains.
His most successful search was of an outdoor patio area, 10 stories up.
“There was so much scent coming up the side of the building, I feared he might go over the edge,” Macaulay said.
Dumas, 34, said in a telephone interview that much of her previous work focused on fine art portraits of working animals, including police dogs and horses. She was researching a project on military dogs returning from service in Iraq and Afghanistan when she learned about the dogs of 9/11. She took the dogs sent by FEMA as her domain and photographed the 15 that were still living from March through May of this year. Three of those dogs have since died, she said.
On one hand, she said, these dogs are just like the average dog, but as working animals, they exhibit a higher degree of concentration.
“They have a higher sense of responsibility,” Dumas said. “They’re not as carefree as most animals. They have a very serious side.”
Macaulay, a transportation and land-use planner with the Solano Transportation Authority, grew up in Reno and attributes his interest in search and rescue work to his experience as a Boy Scout.
“It’s about being prepared and citizenship, being a good member of society,” he said. “It’s how I can give back.”
Macaulay has trained dogs for both wilderness and structural search and rescue. He initially volunteered with the Sacramento Urban Search and Rescue Task Force. He and Orion’s predecessor, Quasar, participated in rescue efforts following the April 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
Macaulay and Orion also went to New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, although because of the deep floodwaters, he said, search opportunities were limited.
Macaulay and Orion’s nephew, 4-year-old Helios, currently volunteer with the Menlo Park Urban Search and Rescue Task Force.
Retired, Orion no longer participates in official searches.
“But part of the bargain is that even when he is retired, I try not to let him know that,” Macaulay said. “He still goes out on training.”
For being the age equivalent of a human about 95 years old, “he’s still darn spry and active,” Macaulay said.
Dumas said it has been gratifying to see the public’s interest in these dogs, as word has circulated about the book.
Like Orion, most of the dogs went on to have long careers after 9/11, Dumas said.
“Now, after 10 years,” she said, “they get their moment to shine.”

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Moxie retired hero enjoying life.

WOBURN (CBS) – Only a handful search and rescue dogs deployed to Ground Zero are still alive, ten years after 9/11.

One of them is Moxie, a 13-year-old chocolate lab in retirement in Winthrop.

Her owner Mark Aliberti says she’s losing her hearing and her vision isn’t great, but it was her strong sense of smell that got her working on 9/11.
“These dogs are air scent dogs, which means they go out and sniff the air and they work their way in to the scent,” Aliberti told WBZ NewsRadio 1030’s Bernice Corpuz. “I’d tell her to go find and she’d search and search and search. If she found somebody or found scent that she’s interested in, she’s trained to penetrate as much as she can, get as close as she can. When she can’t get any closer, she’s trained to start barking and continually bark and just stay there until I join her.”

Moxie and Mark worked up to 16-hour shifts for 8 days at Ground Zero.

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Sirius the Yellow Labrador at 9/11

I want to launch this attempt at honoring heroic dogs on this day. Ten years after the attacks on the United States I can think of no better moment to start writing on these companions dogs, working dogs, street dogs and nameless strays who have saved others without hesitation for their own life in danger. I hope to honor what will be remembered as infamous in the history of the world, as well as a day of marked, bravery , courage and heroism. We saw the worst aspects of humankind and the best aspects of humans and yes dogs working together to rescue, recover and heal the wounds drawn by the terrorist attack in New York, on Flight 96 and the Pentagon.

I will dedicate  most of this months posts to the 9/11 search and rescue dogs.

For this first entry, I would like to honor Sirius the only dog to perish in the attack on the World Trade center. Sirius was a Yellow Labrador assigned to bomb detection at the World Trade Center his handler and companion was officer David Lim. The officer had left Sirius in his kennel to go to the emergency situation on the first tower hit. At the time he was not sure what had happened thinking it was a bomb however he thought the safest place for Sirius would be in the basement of Tower Two where his kennel was and freed the officer to attend to rescue in Tower One. Consequently David Lim was buried in the rubble and found 5 hours later. Thr bond between Officer David Lim and Sirius was very true; “We were very close; no matter where I went, he went. Whatever I asked him to do, he did. He never complained. Sometimes we’d be working for long hours, searching hundreds of cars or trucks, and he’d just look at me like, ‘What do you want me to do now?’ “.Sirius body was not found until January 22nd 2002. Officer David Lim rushed to be there for his fallen partner. All machines were silenced as Officer Lim carried his companion draped in the Flag of the United States and Sirius was given full police honors, His promise to his companion, fellow officer was fulfilled.

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365 Everyday Heros.

365 Everyday Heros..

The idea behind this blog is simply a channel for me to further understand the interspecies companionship between humankind and our best friend in the animal world. For eons since the first canine decided to follow paleolithic humans, the bond between us and them has been sealed. They have followed us on our treks for food and shelter, they have fought along side us in war, they have comforted our sick and dying, they have befriended our young, they have protected our families, they have died for us,caught food for us, they have amused us with their whimsical souls they have worked for us in our societies and civilizations, they have protected us, guided us and even saved countless of our lives. We owe them our deepest gratitude. These pages are my attempt to recognize their courage , sacrifice and honor. And though every dog is an individual this blog is in hopes to recognize their undying loyalty, and selfless nature by sharing the many throughout history who have shown us their heroic and protective nature.

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